"Making Sense of Your Entertainer's Contract"

Reprinted from the PMPI Potomac Memo, July/August 2010 Issue

Back to Home

Back to Event Planning Articles

 

Reviewing and signing an entertainer's contract should not be a difficult task. Following these guidelines will help ensure that the agreement issued is fair, so there will be no surprises on the day of your event. The agreement should be short and simple. It should be approximately one page, or two at the very most. Be wary of entertainers who have multiple page agreements, unless you are hiring a celebrity act for your event. Everything in the agreement should have been discussed before it arrives on your desk. There should not be any elements that catch you off-guard. These rules apply whether booking the entertainer directly or through an agency. You should not feel the need to send the agreement to your legal department for interpretation before signing. What Should be in the Agreement? The agreement should spell out the details of the performance in a clear and concise manner and contain the following: 1.) The name and exact address of the venue If your event is at the Marriott, make sure the entertainer has the correct Marriott. You don’t want the entertainer at the downtown location when you are standing at the Marriott on the other side of town! 2.) Who will be providing what Make sure that it is clearly spelled out who will be providing what for the show. This includes sound systems, lights and staging needs. If travel is involved, the agreement should specify the travel arrangements and who is paying for them. 3.) The time and length of the show While you may have impeccably scheduled your event, the experienced entertainer will realize that this may be an approximation, and they should be flexible with the start time. Be sure you have an agreed upon length of the performance. 4.) Payment arrangements Some entertainers require a deposit for the show and the balance at the event. Some entertainers will require full payment before the show. Others may give you a 10-day period after the event in which to make your payment. No matter the terms, they should be clear in the contract. 5.) Cancellation policy Every agreement should have a cancellation policy which details what will be done in the event of a cancellation. The policy should also address what constitutes an Act of God. 6.) Licensing and Union Requirements The contract should clarify if licensing is required. For example, your venue may need a licensing agreement if you are hiring an ASCAP artist, and your organization may be responsible for obtaining this on their behalf. 7.) A rider A rider is a separate page that details what is required for the entertainer. It can cover specifics of sound systems, travel and ground transportation arrangements, as well as dressing room needs. The majority are short, reasonable and to the point; it is rare to run into the demand banishing brown M&Ms from a dressing room! Making sure that all is spelled out in your agreement with your entertainer will help you to have a successful and worry free event! Jason Linett is an entertainer dedicated to helping you make your next event a big success. To find out more about Jason, visit www.JasonLinett.com or call (800) 850-7082.

 

Back to Home

Back to Event Planning Articles